this week i

migrated that which should be on travis and appveyor to travis and appveyor.

intend to name my future huskies after santa's reindeer.

ordered delivery, ketchup in aluminum foil.  i have been aero-pressing wrong, adding coffee and water with the tube upside-down and the plunger near the bottom edge, screwing on the filter last.  filter should be on, tube over mug, add coffee and water, then plunge.

bought a twenty day pass and walked both ways.  depth perception is perhaps nowhere more vital than crossing the african street.


this week i

explored running paths.  caked in mud, too much foot traffic, dead end, goats.

found a base r bug, solved already.

realized the racist comments on the street about chinese people were for me.  they cannot tell.

woke up.

made breakfast.

ate the breakfast that abebech made for me.


this week i

published on illness and affordability in the middle class and healthcare for immigrants.

walked through a downpour.  when the electricity goes out, an immediate free for all for ethiopian men to whip out their dicks and piss on the roadside under cloak of darkness.

moved in to a little house.


this week i

read the cbo report and published our own analysis of how the senate proposal affects individuals.

people with income below 100 percent of the fpl who were not eligible for medicaid could generally receive premium tax credits under this legislation and not under current law. however, even with the net premium of $300 shown in the illustrative examples for a person with income at 75 percent of the fpl ($11,400 in 2026), the deductible would be more than half their annual income. the net premium of a silver plan for a 40-year-old would be about 15 percent of their annual income, and the deductible would be more than one-third of their annual income. many people in that situation would not purchase any plan, cbo and jct estimate, although some people with assets to protect or who expect to have high use of health care would

woke up sunday in mexico at ten in the ethiopian morning.  nothing until sunrise, then waiting in motion until asleep on the overnight to frankfurt.  eight hours in the pay per day airport lounge with industrial cheese and push-button coffee, but a desk and no shoes so meaningful work before another night of blinking in and out over the tray table.  three month visa to meet the cold fourth of july sunrise and i stayed awake through the new day, searching for a comfortable place to sleep.

had a worthwhile college experience.  laura lived across the hall, sent me this.  thanks dan and kassa


(1) american jails

we have so many prisoners that the american unemployment rate for men would be 2 percent higher (and 8 percent higher for black men) if they were all suddenly let out.  our jails are so packed that through the website wardens and sheriffs can look for space in other facilities if their own is full.  arizona and california have even considered plans to house inmates in mexico, where costs are lower

authorities across the country acted so harshly in part because the united states chooses a sizable proportion of its judges and almost all of its district attorneys and county sheriffs by popular election-something that would be considered bizarre almost everywhere else in the world.  (one recent study of washington state judges found that the sentences they passed out lengthened by an average of 10 percent as reelection day approached.)

prison cures nobody

(2) e.r. baghdad

it's that they have to pretend resuscitation, even when there's no chance of survival, because relatives, often with militia connections, are liable to demand blood money if they're dissatisfied with the doctor's efforts

(3) geographic surrender

as recently as the 1970s, scientists advising the us government openly referred to certain parts of the country being designated 'national sacrifice areas'

after all, if you are a 'hillbilly', who cares about your hills?

take the niger delta, poisoned with an exxon valdez-worth of spilled oil every year, a process ken saro-wiwa, before he was murdered by his government, called 'ecological genocide'